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Surgery

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"A minor surgery is one being performed on someone other than yourself."

Anonymous

Kindness Animal Hospital is fully equipped to perform most surgeries. We perform our surgeries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings and in most cases, the patients can go home the same day. The d octors perform most of the soft tissue surgeries such as spays, neuters, cryptorchids (testicle retained in the abdomen), cystotomy (emoval of stones from the urinary bladder), tumor removals, caesarian sections, etc. To ensure that your pet receives the highest quality care, we will refer you to a board certified surgeon to perform the more intricate soft tissue surgeries and the orthopedic surgeries (bone surgeries).

Anesthesia 
The anesthetic protocol used by most veterinarians consists of two parts, an induction agent and the primary anesthetic (usually a gas). The induction agent is used to render the pet unconscious so that a tube can be inserted down the trachea so that the gas anesthesia can be administered. There are a number of these induction anesthesias that can be used and they all have different effects on the liver, kidneys, blood pressure and the heart. The primary anesthetic we use is Isoflourane gas which is quickly metabolized and is very safe. The gas is used to keep the patient anesthetized during surgery and is easily controlled to maintain the patient at the proper level of anesthesia. Because isoflourane is quickly metabolized, it has no ill effects on the liver or kidneys and the patients wake up relatively quickly when the gas is turned off.

Preanesthetic Testing 
Nobody wants to see their pet undergo anesthesia because of the risks involved. However, there are some things that can be done to reduce the risks. We can perform blood tests to check the function of the kidneys and the liver. If a problem is detected, then an induction agent will be chosen that has little or no effect on the problem organ. No blood work will completely eliminate all the anesthetic risks since there could be some underlying heart problems or other conditions that will not be picked up in the blood work. Although preanesthetic testing is an extra cost it will greatly reduce the risk of anesthesia and in most cases, it is well worth the added expense. In some cases, preanesthetic testing will be a requirement before surgery and in other cases it will be an option presented to you. Typically (but not always) the liver and kidneys in younger animals are in pretty good shape. If you have a young animal and it is within your budget we strongly recommend the blood work. 

Most people do not realize the importance of healthy teeth for the long term health of their pet. In fact, until people started to routinely brush their own teeth, the average life span for humans was not more than 40 years. More than 85% of dogs and cats over four years old have some form of periodontal disease, a painful inflammatory condition in which bacteria attack the gums, ligaments and bone tissues that surround and support the teeth. Senior dogs, those seven or more years old, are especially susceptible to periodontal disease. When you bring your pet in for his/her annual examination, we will check out the teeth and tell you if we think something needs to be done. If left unchecked, bacteria from the mouth can enter the bloodstream and travel to major organs, starting infections there and seriously compromising the health of your pet.


Most periodontal infections begin simply enough. Plaque (which is composed of bacteria, salivary proteins and food debris) builds up in the groove between teeth and gums, causing irritation, redness and swelling. Eventually, pockets form and deepen, allowing bacteria to damage the tissues that hold teeth inplace. At this stage, bacteria from the oral infection have a clear path to the animal's bloodstream and vital organs with the highest blood flow are most susceptible to infection: lungs, heart, kidneys, liver and even the brain. Damage to these organs caused by infection can shorten the lives of dogs and cats. It is not uncommon for pets to come in to our hospital with kidney disease or a heart murmur and we do not know where the problem originated. In many instances, if the pet is older, we can pretty much guess that the infected teeth and gums are the reason.

Dentals are usually preformed on animals five years or older. To perform the dental, we have to anesthetize the pet because they will not sit still and let us work. Since they are older, we usually require preanesthetic testing prior to performing the dental to ensure that their liver and kidneys can handle the anesthesia.

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Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

8:00am

5:30pm

Tuesday:

7:30am

5:30pm

Wednesday:

7:30am

5:30pm

Thursday:

7:30am

5:30pm

Friday:

8:00am

5:30pm

Saturday:

9:00am

1:00pm

Sunday:

Closed

Closed